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Migration Storytelling

Source: Quartz

Amidst the rancor in Europe and the United States over migration, its risks and how to contain or adapt to it, the world is witnessing the rise of new nationalist movements.

Against this background, Urban Logic began researching the history of migration, and how migration stories are told, mythologized and forgotten.

Along with other nonprofits and academic scholars, we are designing the Migration Storytelling Project, with the goal of deriving a common vocabulary to describe the triggers and dramatic elements  of how migration journeys begin, progress and through absorption, delay or repatriation, end.

In September 2016, Urban Logic partnered with 6 Degrees in Toronto Canada and the 19 Million Project to convene a successful simulation of the migration experience.

Our approach to this work builds on that of 19 Million Project’s November 2015 gathering in Rome to assist international journalists in authentically report the journey of Middle Eastern and North African migrants.

Ultimately, we plan to build a Periodic Table of Migration Storytelling Elements as an aid in developing the language for media and ordinary citizens to recount the similarities between their ancestors’ migration journeys, and the migrants’ journeys of today.

Migration Storytelling will help Urban Logic in creating greater social financial literacy for un-/underbanked populations by recalling ancestral traditions and beliefs around responsible economic and monetary actions, such as prioritizing savings and investment for durable assets, over spending and borrowing for the frivolous.

Bruce Cahan

Bruce Cahan is CEO and co-founder of Urban Logic, a nonprofit that harnesses finance and technology to change how systems think, act and feel. He is an Ashoka Fellow, a Consulting Professor at Stanford University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and a CodeX Fellow at Stanford's Center for Legal Informatics. Bruce was trained as an international finance lawyer at Weil Gotshal & Manges in NYC (10 years) and as merchant banker at Asian Oceanic in Hong Kong (2 years). Bruce graduated The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania (B.S. Economics 1976) and Temple Law School (J.D. 1979), and is licensed as a lawyer in California (2006), New York (1980) and Pennsylvania (1980).

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Hacking for Urban Resilience

Urban resilience is a global challenge.  Too often the emergency of the day leads to recriminations and post-event public displays of finger-pointing.  The small voices of the dedicated government official, nonprofit activist, scientific researcher or journalist in hindsight prove prescient, and the catastrophe’s costs of remediation rise to unimaginable levels.

The Rockefeller Foundation’s 100 Resilient Cities Project, and numerous national disaster response plans (such as FEMA‘s) take a longer term view, weaving from cascading risks of failure, a quilt of intersecting and interdependent agency, corporation, NGO and other organizations to forecast and mitigate the threats on urban systems and settings.

Stanford University faculty and students have been applying hackathon / lean startup methods to persistent coordination and other issues in defense and diplomacy settings.  Hacking for Defense (H4D) and Hacking for Diplomacy (H4Di) courses pioneered at Stanford are now being organized and taught at dozens of universities and agencies worldwide. (See this Los Angeles Times article).

Urban Logic has proposed and is now collaborating with faculty at Stanford University and BMNT Partners to organize Hacking for Urban Resilience (H4UR) as  a fast 10-week (one academic calendar quarter) course leveraging the methodologies of H4D and H4Di to support Silicon Valley startup thinking that would anticipate, mitigate and respond to urban disaster conditions.

Bruce Cahan

Bruce Cahan is CEO and co-founder of Urban Logic, a nonprofit that harnesses finance and technology to change how systems think, act and feel. He is an Ashoka Fellow, a Consulting Professor at Stanford University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and a CodeX Fellow at Stanford's Center for Legal Informatics. Bruce was trained as an international finance lawyer at Weil Gotshal & Manges in NYC (10 years) and as merchant banker at Asian Oceanic in Hong Kong (2 years). Bruce graduated The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania (B.S. Economics 1976) and Temple Law School (J.D. 1979), and is licensed as a lawyer in California (2006), New York (1980) and Pennsylvania (1980).

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Jerusalem, Middle East Peace & Money

Jerusalem, Middle East Peace & Money

October 26, 2010 at the Koret-Milken Institute in Jerusalem offered Urban Logic the opportunity to present research on using using interfaith ethics to tag money, and in that way bring greater understanding and tolerance to the various religious groups in and surrounding Israel.

The Koret-Milken Fellows are impressive, and go on to occupy major leadership positions in government and industry in Israel.  The Institute, through Glenn Yago‘s leadership, conducts ground-breaking research on infrastructure, capital finance, legislation and other challenges facing the Israeli Government, business sector and society.koret milken institute

Bruce Cahan

Bruce Cahan is CEO and co-founder of Urban Logic, a nonprofit that harnesses finance and technology to change how systems think, act and feel. He is an Ashoka Fellow, a Consulting Professor at Stanford University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and a CodeX Fellow at Stanford's Center for Legal Informatics. Bruce was trained as an international finance lawyer at Weil Gotshal & Manges in NYC (10 years) and as merchant banker at Asian Oceanic in Hong Kong (2 years). Bruce graduated The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania (B.S. Economics 1976) and Temple Law School (J.D. 1979), and is licensed as a lawyer in California (2006), New York (1980) and Pennsylvania (1980).

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